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The view outside my window matches my mood today.

Spring training is officially underway in Port St. Lucie, Florida and at other sites throughout the Sunshine State and in Arizona.

But unlike most years, I’m just not excited about it.

I wish it were just frustration with the Wilpon family finances, Sandy Alderson‘s doublespeak and the very real possibility that the Mets Opening Day outfield will not include anyone who should be a regular in the major leagues.

Those things are all part of it – a better Mets team would provide a better distraction from real-world problems. But even if we were looking at a team we all thought could win the World Series, I don’t think I’d be that excited about spring training.

Right now, it’s too hard to pretend to care who’s showing up to spring training “in the best shape of their life” while I’m watching my father’s health continue to decline.

Maybe baseball will seem more interesting when the games begin, maybe it won’t. I have no plans to shut down this website, but I don’t really feel motivated to write the way I used to either.

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About Paul Hadsall

I'm the former editor of a weekly community newspaper and current contributor to Hot Stove Baseball. I've been a New York Mets fan for most of my life and I've been blogging about them, minor league baseball, baseball cards and autograph collecting since 2007. Contact me at paul@randombaseballstuff.com

4 responses

  1. Ryan says:

    Paul, very sorry to hear about your father’s health. I will be thinking of you and him. Obviously, blogging has to take a backseat to real life. Take care!

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  2. Paul, I’m sorry to read about your father’s health. In our interview, you had referenced a Bud Harrelson card that he had given you, and I’m sure that your love of cards and collecting is, in part, a transference of your love for your father. At least that’s how I think of my mother and baseball, they are entwined. Loving one becomes an expression of love for the other. One bit of advice I will offer, from a father with a 19-year-old son who is a two-time cancer survivor: Distraction is a good thing. It’s good to think about other things, enjoy small pleasures, even when life is hard. Perhaps especially when life is hard. My best, JP.

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