Andy Pettitte: “I don’t really believe I tried to enhance my performance” | HardballTalk

It’s really fascinating to see the difference in how Andy Pettitte and Alex Rodriguez are getting treated this week.

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Here’s Andy Pettitte on Michael Kay’s radio show addressing his PED history:

“People are going to say what they want to, believe what they want to. When you say PEDs to me, man, I just can’t even comprehend that with me just because I don’t really believe I tried to enhance my performance on the field,” Pettitte said. “If I would have, I would have told y’all that. Man, my story has been an open book. When it all came out [in the Mitchell report in 2007,] I sat in the press conferences there for hours, I believe . . . I’ve never tried to do anything to cheat to enhance my performance on the field.”

Where are all of the people who have spent the last 24 hours parsing Alex Rodriguez’s apology and why aren’t they parsing this? No one? Anyone? OK then, allow me:

  • Taking PEDs to “get back…

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About Paul

NY Mets enthusiast, toy collector, amateur gardener, Christian. I like to take pictures & write things.

Posted on February 18, 2015, in Baseball and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. The difference between Pettitte and A-Rod is that Pettitte comes across as nowhere as close to arrogant and in denial as A-Rod is and has and, therefore, we’re willing to give him the benefit of the doubt.

    Other than that, they’re the same guy. “(He doesn’t) really believe (he) tried to enhance his performance on the field” and he only took the stuff for two days, which is nowhere close to deciding whether or not the PED would have any effect and which turned out not to be true anyway? If he said, “I tried it (for however long). And it didn’t do for me what I thought it would and I gave it up. But, yes, I was a user and it was wrong,” or even “It took a while, but my conscience kicked in and, though I always looked for an edge anywhere possible, even this was over the line,” he’d hold a lot more credibility in my eyes as I expect a professional anything–athlete, whatever–to do whatever they think they can get away with to get whatever edge they think they can. I was a professional in my job before I retired. And, with the knowledge of my craft, I knew where I could lay back and where I could cut corners.

    So, as even chewing tobacco is a performance enhancer (see Klapisch’s column in The Record from a few months ago), I can’t blame a guy for trying stuff. Except, of course, that, unlike tobacco, which is sadly legal, steroids haven’t been in over 20 years, at least without a prescription.

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