A look at the Mets Museum

A few weeks ago, I finally had the chance to wander around Citi Field before a Mets vs. Phillies game. My first stop was the Mets Museum.

I was initially disappointed that there seemed to be less “stuff” on display than in previous years, but I think the 2015 setup actually represents the best balance between the different eras of Mets history that they’ve had since it opened.

You’ve got Ed Kranepool’s contract from 1973 on display along with one of Rusty Staub‘s bats, one of Darryl Strawberry‘s batting helmets, Mike Hampton‘s 2000 World Series cap, Endy Chavez‘s jersey from the 2006 NLCS game that made him famous and Juan Lagares‘ Gold Glove Award.

While it would be nice to see more of an effort to use the artifacts to illustrate a timeline of Mets history, I can see why the staff members don’t bother. The items are almost all on loan from collectors (or sometimes the players themselves) and will only be on display for one year.

I recommend a visit the next time you are at Citi Field.

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About Paul

NY Mets enthusiast, toy collector, amateur gardener, Christian. I like to take pictures & write things.

Posted on June 16, 2015, in New York Mets and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. Paul,

    Oh, goody, just what I want to see on display–sedentary stuff like uniforms, helmets and contracts. Are the same people who run the HOF in Cooperstown running the Mets museum?

    You know I like my baseball as I’ve played (not well), written, broadcast, scored, edited and umpired. But, after going to Cooperstown, I wanted to hang myself (no, not really–I just felt like it), as you can look at only so much in glass cases before you say “enough.” The basketball HOF was more interactive back in the ’80s than baseball is now. And the Mets are doing the same thing. I’ll pass.

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    • Hi Paul. I am currently in the process of curating a baseball exhibition for the Ohr-O’Keefe Museum in Biloxi, Mississippi (www.georgeohr.org). I was very interested in your comments abouthow the game is portrayed in exhibits. What would you like to see,..and find of real value in a baseball exhibition. Thanks. Kevin O’Brien

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