Rare Duke Snider Mets baseball card set record auction price

A rarely seen Duke Snider baseball card issued by the Nassau County (Long Island) Boy Scouts in 1963 sold for $866.40 in an auction earlier this month by Clean Sweep.

 

 1963 Nassau County Boy Scouts Duke Snider baseball card (Clean Sweep Auctions image via Forbes)

1963 Nassau County Boy Scouts Duke Snider baseball card (Clean Sweep Auctions image via Forbes)

 
I never expected to read about a rare regionally-issued baseball card in Forbes, but that’s exactly where I learned about this one in an article by David Seideman.

About Paul

NY Mets enthusiast, toy collector, amateur gardener, Christian. I like to take pictures & write things.

Posted on September 27, 2015, in Auction Watch, Baseball Cards, New York Mets and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. I realize it’s been 52 years, but does Star Outfielder Duke Snider still want to talk to me? I hope I didn’t leave him hanging too long…🙂

    I’m surprised that a very rare card of a HOFer went for only $866. A tiny little part of me is saying “Well shoot, I could’ve bought that!… in theory, anyway…”

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    • Lol – I still don’t quite understand how those old phone numbers worked. (And I would much rather have an actual rare baseball card than one of these modern rarities that only exist because Topps decided to serial number them 1/2…where’s the story or sense of history in that?)

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      • I just barely remember people referring to phone numbers this way, but it’s no different than what we have now, it’s just that there were certain exchanges that used to be referred to by the letter equivalent of the first two or three digits of the number… In this case, C=2, H=4, so the number was 248-7060. When saying it out loud, people probably said something like “Chestnut 8 – 7060″…. like the old song, “Pennsylvania 6-5000” (736-5000)

        It made it easier to remember the exchange, and It clearly worked because I still remember a couple of numbers like that from my childhood, and now I don’t even know what the number were for.

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        • I barely remember being able to dial a 7 digit number without the area code (slight exaggeration, but not really.) Thanks for explaining the old system.

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