Blog Archives

A look at the Mets Museum

A few weeks ago, I finally had the chance to wander around Citi Field before a Mets vs. Phillies game. My first stop was the Mets Museum.

I was initially disappointed that there seemed to be less “stuff” on display than in previous years, but I think the 2015 setup actually represents the best balance between the different eras of Mets history that they’ve had since it opened.

You’ve got Ed Kranepool’s contract from 1973 on display along with one of Rusty Staub‘s bats, one of Darryl Strawberry‘s batting helmets, Mike Hampton‘s 2000 World Series cap, Endy Chavez‘s jersey from the 2006 NLCS game that made him famous and Juan Lagares‘ Gold Glove Award.

While it would be nice to see more of an effort to use the artifacts to illustrate a timeline of Mets history, I can see why the staff members don’t bother. The items are almost all on loan from collectors (or sometimes the players themselves) and will only be on display for one year.

I recommend a visit the next time you are at Citi Field.

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Mets baseball cards from Baseball Cards Magazine

Not exactly Topps Heritage... these two cards were printed by Baseball Cards Magazine in 1989 to entice readers to buy the monthly publication during the peak of the baseball card boom.

Not exactly Topps Heritage… these two cards were printed by Baseball Cards Magazine in 1989 to entice readers to buy the monthly publication during the peak of the baseball card boom.

After more than a decade of Topps Heritage sets, not to mention various other vintage-themed sets, baseball cards featuring current ballplayers on classic designs almost seems overdone.

In 1984, it was a novelty. Baseball Cards Magazine included a Dale Murphy card in the style of Topps’ classic 1953 set with its August issue that year, starting a trend that continued through 1993.

I say “baseball card,” but the “repli-cards” you got in the magazine¬†weren’t exactly the same as the cards you’d find inside a wax pack made by Topps, Donruss or Fleer. Instead of the poly-bagged promo cards you might find bundled with some current magazines, Baseball Cards Magazine included an insert stapled (or glued) into the spine that was printed on thin cardboard. If you wanted your new collectibles to look like baseball cards, you had to be pretty good with the scissors when you cut them out from the panel.

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Mets baseball cards, from Tom Seaver to Zack Wheeler

I want to thank Geof for surprising me with these Mets baseball cards (and a Mets windbreaker.) They brightened my day, and are giving me something to talk about besides last night’s discouraging loss to the Brewers.

 

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How can you go wrong with Tom Seaver? (I haven’t bought any Gypsy Queen cards this year – is this a parallel or did they go black & white with the set?) Read the rest of this entry